The Backup Camera Demo That Makes You a Star

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blind zone

Here’s how to present backup cameras and to introduce yourself as an outstanding “star” citizen in your community.

The demo we are about to describe will also help you promote awareness about driver safety, and help you win new customers.  It was presented at the recent Mobile Electronics Show (KnowledgeFest) by Janette Fennell of Kidsandcars.org:

Many vehicles have a blind zone behind them that is about 20 to 30 feet long and 8 feet wide.  To show the blind zone, you place an orange traffic cone behind the car and ask if the driver can see it.  No?  Walk back a few feet. How about now?  The cone is about the size of a toddler or young child.  Keep walking back until the driver sees the cone, which shows the size of the blind zone.

backover deaths
CLICK TO ENLARGE:
BACKOVER DEATHS BY STATE

Have plastic sheeting cut in the 8 x 20 or 8 x 30 foot lengths to further dramatize the blind zone (see photo above).

The Mobile Electronics Group (MERA) and Kidsandcars is offering a demo kit with a collapsible cone with flashing lights for $249 but it’s easy to make one up yourself.

Then you take this show on the road.  Fennell suggests calling the local fire and police departments.  They hold safety days and you can offer to perform the blind zone demo.   There are also similar safety days held at local schools or you can hold your own and invite the fire department to come to the shop and demo fire safety. A fire truck in front of the store will help attract new customers.

Also, be armed with a few facts: 50 kids a week are backed over by a vehicle.  Two of them die each week.  70 percent of the time the car is driven by a relative or close family friend.  Click on the chart on right for backover deaths by state.

At a panel on safety at the ME Show, VOXX suggested retailers print up fliers they can leave at the fire department or police that say, “We’ll evaluate your car for safety at no charge.”  During the evaluation you can also talk about teen tracking and DVRs.  People, especially teens, tend to drive better when they know there’s a DVR in the car.

Source: CEoutlook

 

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