First Car Audio NFC Device?

share on:

A new  gadget plugs into your car stereo and lets you stream music over Near Field Communications (NFC)– a wireless service similar to Bluetooth that is more secure, but has shorter range.

BlackBerry Music Gateway The matchbox-sized Blackberry device plugs into the car radio’s auxiliary jack.  It works with any phone or tablet with NFC, not just Blackberry phones.  And you just tap your phone against the  device to pair it.   Your phone becomes a remote control over the music to change tracks, volume, or pause.

Don’t have an NFC phone?  The $50 device called the BlackBerry Music Gateway, also offers Bluetooth audio streaming if you pair your phone or tablet. And it works with a home stereo too.

We’re not expecting car stereo makers to rush to replace Bluetooth with NFC.   While NFC provides a secure connection, its range is only about 4 inches.

Kenwood’s Rick Noetzli noted, “Right now there just doesn’t seem to be any practical use for NFC, you’d be hard pressed to find a reason you’d need it,” in the case of car audio.

But there may be other uses for NFC on the OEM side, he said.   The car might recognize your key and then adjust seats and other controls to your personal settings.  Harman recently showed such system in a concept vehicle. It also automatically updated your Facebook, Twitter and email when you entered the car for use via Aha’s cloud connected radio app.

The technology might also have a place in car security.  Directed stated, “We are very interested in the direction that Near Field Communications technology is heading, that is the future. While we are closely watching  and keeping up with NFC and many other mobile technologies — we have no products that use Near Field Communications in car aftermarket security at this time.”

The new BlackBerry Gateway (not to be confused with an older version without NFC) is available for pre-order and should be available in June.

Source:  SlashGear, CEoutlook

Photo via SlashGear

share on: